VOL IV
2004
ISSN 1473-219X

© Imperium and the contributors 2004

current contents
articles

articles

ABSTRACT:

There has recently been considerable debate over the tendency within international cultural studies to privilege British cultural studies as the original cultural studies formation. As Handel K Wright points out, the majority of accounts of the origins and formation of British cultural studies tend to reinforce a mythologised and monolithic interpretation of its historical development. Jon Stratton and Ien Ang have also been highly critical of the tendency within British cultural studies to construct its own ‘myth of origin,’ a myth which they argue operates ‘within the (white) Great Man (sic) theory of (colonial, patriarchal) history.' What concerns them is the way in which the myths constructed around British cultural studies tend to be positioned within a primarily intra-national framework whereby the development of cultural studies is portrayed as being untouched by external forces. In contrast, Stratton and Ang argue that instead of seeing cultural studies as a primarily British formation which has been subsequently exported to other national sites, ‘it might be better to speak about a geographically dispersed plurality of intellectual trajectories and movements, largely in the post-1960s period and in western, English-speaking countries, which, under precise historical conditions which need to be further explored, converged into the aforementioned international rendez-vous’ What interests me in this essay is Stratton and Ang’s argument that the history of British cultural studies might be usefully recast in terms of issues of race and cultural identity. This essay takes that viewpoint and elaborates in terms of the history of cultural studies as a discipline.

ABSTRACT:

The tension between political engagement and consumerism is not so starkly presented in many female cultural spaces where the feminism that Coward argues ‘has sunk into our unconscious’ operates as a structuring absence. It is a feminism, which, as Probyn has suggested, is ‘bound up with the discourse of choice’: life choices between, for example, motherhood and childlessness or paid and domestic labour. However, in recent years, particularly, these choices have been articulated in terms of lifestyle and consumer culture. Women’s magazines such as Cosmopolitan under Julie D’Acci’s editorship in the nineties, built their success upon allowing women to play with fantasies of a range of subject positions – around the twin pleasures of a feminist political awareness and consumer femininity; a successful combination that could also account for the success of Body Shop in the nineties. At first glance, Marie Claire, the magazine which I intend to use as a case study, seems no different; its 300-400 sumptuous glossy pages are packed with all the usual elements of an up-market women’s monthly. However, a more detailed analysis demonstrates a complex interaction of discourses regarding feminism and the female reader's viewpoint which this paper attempts to describe.

 

ABSTRACT:

While the twenty-first century is typified by globalisation, Italy, it seems, retains its centuries old fascination for specific nationalities especially the British. Apart from portraying the various beauties of the Italian sun, landscape, art and music during the twentieth century, British writers have also started to reflect on another aspect of their cultural contact with Italians – marriage; the adventure of crossing cultures. As Peter M Blau asserts: ‘There is a strain towards imbalance as well as toward reciprocity in social associations… A person who is attracted to another will seek to prove himself attractive to the other.’ The imbalance in the so-called social associations – ie, marriage – gets more complicated in the relational network of intercultural marriages – in this particular case, a Briton marrying an Italian or vice versa. For the purpose of this essay, I am going to discuss intercultural marriages in Eric Linklater’s Private Angelo, Jonathan Keates’s The Strangers’ Gallery and Tim Parks’s Cara Massimina, Europa and Destiny, with the aim of discussing the kind of confrontation marriage with an Italian creates from the British male writer’s perspective. British women writers are not included in this discussion since generally, in the second half of the twentieth century, their choice of falling in love with a member of the counter culture functions as an end of the narrative between the respective couples, such as in Sarah Woodhouse’s Meeting Lily, Anita Brookner’s Family and Friends and Iris Murdoch’s The Italian Girl.

ABSTRACT:

This paper is an unedited transcript of the text of the Spring 2002 Honors Excellence Lecture delivered at Florida State University. It ranges widely over the territories and discourses of contemporary tourism studies and relates theory to practice.

ABSTRACT:

An interdisciplinary approach is necessary to fully understand theology in the postmodern world. The days when theology wasa single discipline are effectively over. Now, apart from specialised theological vocational training, theology turns toward other disciplines for information but also for a redefinition of its own identity and scope. To demonstrate the benefits of applying the approaches of several disciplines to religious studies, I will focus on the example of' speaking in tongues' as witnessed in the Pentecostal movement. By addressing this phenomenon from several perspectives, it becomes clear that interdisciplinary enquiry enables scholars of religion to understand and illuminate religious acts in social, cultural and psychological contexts which may not be apparent when applying purely historical methods of examination.

ABSTRACT:

This paper examines developments in international television news and their implications for the coverage of conflict situations at a time when the political, economic and technological contexts in which news organizations operate are becoming increasingly global. In the media-saturated world, with a constant flow of words, sounds and images, ‘24/7 News’ (24-hour news, seven days a week) has emerged as a television genre in its own right. Given the fiercely competitive commercial environment within which television news networks have to function, television has to be live and the most important ‘live TV’ is news, because of its contemporaneity and the ability to transmit it instantaneously to a global audience. This has been facilitated by a market-led broadcasting ecology and the availability of privatised satellite networks.

 

 

 





















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The Centre for International Media
Analysis, Department of Media Arts, University of Luton, UK